Showing: 1 - 10 of 85 RESULTS

Renewable Technology Will Take Starring Role As Energy Recovers From Covid-19

The global energy system is in a state of upheaval, thanks to the Covid-19 pandemic, which has “caused more disruption than any other event in recent history, leaving scars that will last for years to come,” says the International Energy Agency (IEA) in its latest World Energy Outlook (WEO).

“But whether this upheaval ultimately helps or hinders efforts to accelerate clean energy transitions and reach international energy and climate goals will depend on how governments respond to today’s challenges,” the report adds, suggesting that the next decade will be pivotal to both recovering from the current crisis and to tackling climate change.

Global energy demand is set to drop by 5% in 2020, with energy-related CO2 emissions down by 7% and investment in the sector 18% lower than the previous year as the pandemic-induced lockdowns around the world depress economic activity. Global energy

Read More

COVID-19 Accelerates Trends In Emerging Markets’ Corporate Debt

As an asset class, emerging markets’ corporate debt has shown quite a bit of resiliency. Longer term, we think the COVID-19 crisis will likely accelerate trends that were already underway.

As an asset class, EM corporates have shown quite a bit of resiliency. While defaults are likely to pick up some from here, they’re not expected to be anywhere near financial crisis levels or the original knee-jerk expectations of many on the sell-side.

In general, companies in our universe have been appropriately managing their maturity profiles for a while now and this has been evident during the COVID-19 pandemic. Longer term, we think the COVID-19 crisis will likely accelerate trends that were already underway.

The transition to a greener economy is evident as many countries have set limits to their nonrenewable resources as part of their electric generation matrix, and companies incorporate those plans. The rise of ESG as an

Read More

Pearson’s strategy pays off as COVID-19 accelerates online learning

By Kate Holton

LONDON (Reuters) – The outgoing boss of Pearson hailed the wisdom of his lengthy and often painful battle to rebuild the education group for a digital generation on Wednesday after COVID-19 accelerated the switch to online learning.

John Fallon, who issued a string of profit warnings as students moved from expensive textbooks to digital learning, said the company would not have been able to cope with the rapid shift online during the pandemic had it not previously prepared.

While group sales fell in the first nine months due to cancelled tests and closed schools, global online learning jumped 32% in the third quarter.

Fallon said while he “owned” the profit downgrades and the shareprice drop – falling more than 50% during his tenure – he said he had also earned the right to ask where the company would be if he had not taken out costs and

Read More

New research database can help shape the most effective and efficient response to COVID-19

Researchers around the world can tap into a new inter-disciplinary online database of COVID-19 research – allowing them to search for new partners, resources and funding to boost the global battle against the virus.

Launched today, the international open-access database for ongoing research activity COVID CORPUS aims to encourage collaboration and reduce duplication between researchers across all academic disciplines working on Covid-19 research.

Through its easy-to-use interface, the database will allow researchers and funders around the globe to coordinate, collaborate and network to help shape the most effective and efficient response to COVID-19 and its many impacts.

University of Birmingham experts in Computer Science and Medicine worked with the Institute for Global Innovation to create the database, which includes all disciplines of research, including health-related, socio-economic, behavioural, educational, cultural, science and technology.

Fighting COVID-19 requires the academic community to share ideas

Read More

Commentary: COVID-19 contact tracing apps: Choose the technology wisely

There has been significant interest in leveraging smartphone apps for contact tracing, a public health strategy that involves tracking people who are COVID-19 positive to identify disease hot spots. Traditionally this is done by workers on foot and over the telephone, and we know this labor-intensive method works — it has helped in the elimination of smallpox and in curbing the spread of sexually transmitted infections. However, the efficacy of the app-boosted method is still unknown.

Unfortunately, pressure to ease lockdowns has led to a mad dash to develop and use such apps for COVID-19, resulting in a wildly different array of options. As public health departments are pushed to follow suit, we must be careful about which technologies we adopt.

Several dozen states and companies have already started developing and using digital tools. In the spring, Utah released an app, called Healthy Together, which was built by a social

Read More

More than 1,000 UK startups ‘collapsed’ due to COVID-19

Cars and cyclists pass through the Silicon Roundabout area, a technology cluster of high-tech companies located in Shoreditch and St. Lukes in East London. (Credit: Mike Kemp/Getty Images)
Cars and cyclists pass through the Silicon Roundabout area, a technology cluster of high-tech companies located in Shoreditch and St. Lukes in East London. Photo: Mike Kemp/Getty Images

More than 1,000 of the UK’s high-growth businesses have filed for administration, liquidation or dissolution since lockdown began, according to new research released today by Plexal and Beauhurst.

During this period, September brought a record number of filings — the highest monthly figure in 10 years – as the full impact of COVID-19 started to be revealed. 273 fast-growth companies filed for administration, liquidation or dissolution in that month alone, out of a total of 1,067 since the beginning of lockdown. That’s a 181% month-on-month increase compared with August.

While government schemes provided “valuable support to cash-strapped early stage companies struggling from the COVID-19 crisis,” said the researchers, “the sharp rise in startup deaths highlights the fading preservative effect of government support

Read More

The iPhone 12 is supposed to be a blowout upgrade. But COVID-19 could change that

iphone-12-pro-and-iphone-12-pro-max-apple-google-chrome-13-10-2020-19-47-14-2.png

This year, Apple introduced four iPhones, ranging from the iPhone 12 Mini to the iPhone 12 Pro Max.


Apple

This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple headquarters.

Apple’s iPhone 12 family hits the market at an extraordinary time — with the coronavirus pandemic leaving tens of millions of people out of jobs and kicking off a recession that has thrown everything into a state of uncertainty. The new phones feature a boxier look, a magnetic attachment called MagSafe and, yes, super-fast 5G, but the price tag of these typically premium gadgets may be more important than ever. 

Rivals have already responded to the economic and health crisis. Samsung unveiled the Galaxy S20 FE, a budget phone with high-end specs wrapped in a plastic housing that helps push its price down to $700 from the $1,000 price tag for its

Read More

Alcohol use changed right after COVID-19 lockdown — ScienceDaily

One in four adults reported a change in alcohol use almost immediately after stay-at-home orders were issued, according to a study of twins led by Washington State University researchers.

The study, published recently in Frontiers in Psychiatry, surveyed more than 900 twin pairs from the Washington State Twin Registry from March 26 to April 5, 2020, just after stay-at-home orders were issued in Washington on March 23. An estimated 14% of survey respondents said they drank more alcohol than the week prior and reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those who did not drink alcohol and those whose use stayed the same.

“We expected that down the road people might turn to alcohol after the stay-at-home orders were issued, but apparently it happened right off the bat,” said Ally Avery, lead author of the study and a scientific operations manager at WSU’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

Read More

Surgical Imaging Devices Market will be Positively Influenced by COVID-19 | 4% CAGR Projection During 2020-2024

Technavio has been monitoring the surgical imaging devices market and it is poised to grow by USD 683.83 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of almost 4% during the forecast period. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005855/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Surgical Imaging Devices Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

Technavio’s in-depth research has all your needs covered as our research reports include all foreseeable market scenarios, including pre- & post-COVID-19 analysis. Download Latest Free Sample Report on COVID-19 Analysis

The market is fragmented, and the degree of fragmentation will accelerate during the forecast period. Canon Inc., General Electric Co., Hitachi Ltd., Hologic Inc., Koninklijke Philips NV, Medtronic Plc, Shimadzu Corp., Siemens Healthineers AG, Skanray Technologies Pvt. Ltd., and

Read More

Researchers confirm the safety of home discharge for low-risk patients with COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

A new study shows that the vast majority of patients who visited the Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department at Cedars-Sinai with suspected COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) symptoms, and who were treated and sent home to recuperate, recovered within a week.

The study, published by the Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open, showed that none of those patients died from the virus and fewer than 1% required intensive care.

“When the pandemic began there was minimal evidence to guide us as to who should be hospitalized and who could be sent home,” said Sam Torbati, MD, co-chair and medical director of the Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department at Cedars-Sinai. “In real time, we began developing our criteria for who needed hospitalization for monitoring, intensive care, and who could recover at home. And this study shows our patients received the appropriate level of care.”

In the retrospective study,

Read More