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Cameras that can learn what they are viewing — ScienceDaily

Intelligent cameras could be one step closer thanks to a research collaboration between the Universities of Bristol and Manchester who have developed cameras that can learn and understand what they are seeing.

Roboticists and artificial intelligence (AI) researchers know there is a problem in how current systems sense and process the world. Currently they are still combining sensors, like digital cameras that are designed for recording images, with computing devices like graphics processing units (GPUs) designed to accelerate graphics for video games.

This means AI systems perceive the world only after recording and transmitting visual information between sensors and processors. But many things that can be seen are often irrelevant for the task at hand, such as the detail of leaves on roadside trees as an autonomous car passes by. However, at the moment all this information is captured by sensors in meticulous detail and sent clogging the system with

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What Marketers Can Learn From Consumers’ Response To The Pandemic

Alon Ghelber is CMO at Revuze; an AI StartUp analyzing customer reviews & delivering product insights to optimize decision-making.

While most businesses suffer hardships from time to time, the pandemic has only increased the frightening dominance of giants like Alibaba and Amazon. Many people are relying on online services right now, and e-commerce businesses have seen strong competition in both the East and the West markets.

When analyzing e-commerce opinions around the world, my team at Revuze witnessed some differences in how retail and e-commerce have adjusted across Europe and North America vs. Asia-Pacific.

In this article, I will cover the similarities and differences of e-commerce strategies for the East and the West amid the pandemic, and what marketers can take away.

The Impact Of Covid-19 On Businesses Around The World

The pandemic is shaking up businesses and consumer behavior (subscription required) on a massive scale. Around 20%

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Pittsburgh-Area School Districts Use Technology To Help Students Learn In New Ways

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Teaching remotely is a big challenge, but many local school districts are taking advantage of new technology.

Teachers at Pine-Richland schools wear wireless microphones and use tracking cameras, document cameras and interactive display boards with mounted cameras so students both in school and at home can see the same things.

In the Elizabeth Forward and Avonworth school districts, teachers are using Gizmos virtual science labs, which allows students to manipulate the variables and work together.



a person standing in front of a computer


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(Photo Credit: KDKA)

Elizabeth Forward Middle School eighth-grader Joseph Maksin grew virtual plants.

“You got to pick what type of plant you were using, how much soil, the amount of sun it was getting, how much water it was getting, and it would show a time-lapse of how it was growing,” said Maksin.

His pre-biology teacher at Elizabeth Forward Middle School, Rachel Lintelman, said, “I liked

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What Can We Learn Today From Science and Technology Development in WWII?

Anti-aircraft guns in London during the Blitz of 1940 were mostly for show. It was extremely difficult to shoot down an aircraft. The shells launched to explode in an enemy bomber’s flight path had to be timed to one-fortieth of a second, explained Future Tense fellow Jaime Holmes in a recent online event co-sponsored by Future Tense and Issues in Science and Technology. A timing device a second off would mean an explosion 2,000 feet from its intended target.



a herd of cattle standing on top of a building: The aftermath of a V-1 flying bomb strike in central London, June 1944 U.S. Army Signal Corps/National Archives


© U.S. Army Signal Corps/National Archives
The aftermath of a V-1 flying bomb strike in central London, June 1944 U.S. Army Signal Corps/National Archives

It’s no surprise, then, that at the start of the Blitz it took about 20,000 shells to shoot down a single airplane.

Developing a solution to the problem—an electronic sensor within a shell that could detect a nearby aircraft and blow up in its proximity—was simple

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