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Intersectional Gender And Pay Parity In Tech

AnitaB.org CEO Brenda Darden Wilkerson shares top takeaways focused on driving change toward intersectional gender and pay parity for the tech industry coming out of vGHC 2020.

Where to start? This was the question that opened the annual Grace Hopper Celebration several weeks back as it has been the topic leading millions of conversations on the pandemic, social justice, political unrest, natural disaster and more. In acknowledging the many trying moments of recent months, especially within the setting of a celebration, the focus became less about what one might expect to hear, and more about what needs to be said.

When it comes to achieving intersectional gender and pay parity around the world, let alone in the tech industry, figuring out where to start is an

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EcoGrid Technologies makes energy efficiency projects pay for themselves with innovative technology

TORONTO, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ – Every day, Canadian companies struggle to reduce their carbon footprint without increasing their bottom line.

That might sound like a lofty goal, but EcoGrid Technologies, an energy equipment and solutions company based out of Toronto, ON, has a proven track record of helping industrial operators launch energy efficiency projects that pay for themselves and increase cash flow at the same time.

Recently, EcoGrid Technologies worked with LHM Technologies Inc. of Woodbridge, ON to replace facility lighting in its 50,000 square foot state-of-the-art manufacturing space, where they produce high quality precision components for the aerospace, military, automotive, oil and gas and nuclear energy sectors.

“We are proud to have helped LHM fit its production facility with our state-of-the-art wireless solution,” says George Filtsos, President of EcoGrid Technologies. “Using our exclusive cutting-edge Bluetooth controls to automate illumination levels base on usage has resulted in more than

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New York City Says It Can’t Afford Teachers’ Back Pay

New York City can’t afford to pay a lump sum due its teachers because of the new coronavirus, city officials said Thursday, reflecting a fiscal crisis that has already led to budget cuts and service reductions.

The city teachers union, which puts the amount due this month at $900 million, called Thursday for immediate arbitration.

First Deputy Mayor Dean Fuleihan sent the union a letter saying the budget impact of the pandemic was “debilitating and not yet fully known,” and the city couldn’t afford to pay a lump sum due to active and retired teachers scheduled for this month under a 2014 agreement.

“It is the City’s desire to avoid the necessity for layoffs, and to make a retroactive payment at this time would therefore be fiscally irresponsible,” Mr. Fuleihan’s letter said.

The dispute comes during a hectic and tense back-to-school season. In August, the union threatened to strike if

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PlayStation Inventor Starts New Career Making Robots for No Pay

(Bloomberg) — Ken Kutaragi, the legendary inventor of the PlayStation gaming console, is taking on one of the hardest jobs in robotics. And he’s getting paid nothing to do it.

The founder of Sony Corp.’s gaming business is the new chief executive officer of Ascent Robotics Inc., a Tokyo-based artificial intelligence startup. Kutaragi, 70, wants to make affordable robots that can safely move around and do physical work alongside humans in factories and logistics centers, and aims to have a working prototype in about a year. He said he receives no salary to save precious capital.



Ken Kutaragi standing in a room: PlayStation Inventor Ken Kutaragi Starts New Career Making Robots


© Bloomberg
PlayStation Inventor Ken Kutaragi Starts New Career Making Robots

Ken Kutaragi in Tokyo on Oct. 8.

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Photographer: Kentaro Takahashi/Bloomberg

“The Covid-19 outbreak has turned the old argument about robots taking our jobs on its head,” Kutaragi said in his first interview since taking the helm in August. “It’s pretty clear

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Google must negotiate to pay for French news, appeals court confirms

Google’s appeal against an order by France’s competition watchdog to negotiate with publishers for reuse of snippets of their content has failed.

As we reported in April, the French authority was acting on a new ‘neighbouring right’ for news which was transposed into national law following a pan-EU copyright reform agreed last year.

The Paris court slap-down leaves little legal wiggle room for the tech giant when it comes to shelling out for reusing French publishers’ content.

France’s competition authority already ruled it can’t unilaterally withdraw the snippets shown in its Google News aggregator (and elsewhere on its search service) — as it did when the national law came into force, seeking to evade payment.

Reached for comment on the appeal court decision, a Google spokesperson sent us this statement: “As we announced yesterday, our priority remains to reach an agreement with the French publishers and press agencies. We

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Senate queries Ministry of Science, Tech for giving out vehicles worth N17m to pay debt of N2m

Senate queries Ministry of Science, Tech for giving out vehicles worth N17m to pay debt of N2m
Senate President Lawan

By Henry Umoru

The Senate Wednesday queried the Ministry of Science and Technology for giving out two vehicles worth N17 million to pay the debt of N2 million owned contractors.

The two vehicles with registration numbers are M50-101G and MGO-12FG respectively.

The revelation came up following the 2015 Auditor-General Report submitted to the Senator Matthew Urhoghide, Peoples Democratic Party, PDP, Edo South led Senate Committee on Public Accounts.

According to the Auditor General of the Federation, Anthony Ayine in the report submitted to the Committee, he said that during the verification of non-recurrent assets of the Ministry, it was discovered that two vehicles with registration M50-101G and MGO-12FG respectively were not seen and their whereabouts was not explained.

In his presentation, Director, Public Accounts in office of the Auditor General of the Federation, OAuGF, the two vehicles were seized by contractors.

But the Permanent Secretary of the

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First empirical study on how users pay visual attention to mobile app designs shows larger and brighter elements don’t catch our eyes after all — ScienceDaily

As part of an international collaboration, Aalto University researchers have shown that our common understanding of what attracts visual attention to screens, in fact, does not transfer to mobile applications. Despite the widespread use of mobile phones and tablets in our everyday lives, this is the first study to empirically test how users’ eyes follow commonly used mobile app elements.

Previous work on what attracts visual attention, or visual saliency, has centered on desktop and web-interfaces.

‘Apps appear differently on a phone than on a desktop computer or browser: they’re on a smaller screen which simply fits fewer elements and, instead of a horizontal view, mobile devices typically use a vertical layout. Until now it was unclear how these factors would affect how apps actually attract our eyes,’ explains Aalto University Professor Antti Oulasvirta.

In the study, the research team used a large set of representative mobile interfaces and eye

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Amazon’s palm reader offers a new way to pay at stores

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Palm reading has arrived at two Amazon Go stores.


Amazon

Amazon already got rid of checkout lines at its brick-and-mortar Amazon Go stores. Now it wants to make getting into those stores easier too. Last week, the retail giant started letting people use its latest biometric tech — a palm reader dubbed Amazon One — to enter two Amazon Go locations in Seattle. Amazon unveiled the new tech ahead of its annual Prime Day shopping event, which will take place Oct. 13-14 this year.

“Amazon One is a fast, convenient, contactless way for people to use their palm to make everyday activities like paying at a store, presenting a loyalty card, entering a location like a stadium, or badging into work more effortless,” Dilip Kumar, Amazon’s vice president of physical retail and technology, said Sept. 29 in a blog post. “The service is designed to be highly secure

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Slow, basic science may pay off

Nobel Prizes and COVID-19: Slow, basic science may pay off
In this April 17, 2015, file photo, a national library employee shows a gold Nobel Prize medal in Bogota, Colombia. The Nobels, with new winners announced starting Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, often concentrate on unheralded, methodical, basic science. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara, File)

While the world wants flashy quick fixes for everything, especially massive threats like the coronavirus and global warming, next week’s Nobel Prizes remind us that in science, slow and steady pays off.


It may soon do so again.

Science builds upon previous work, with thinkers “standing on the shoulders of giants,” as Isaac Newton put it, and it starts with basic research aimed at understanding a problem before fixing it. It’s that type of basic science that the Nobels usually reward, often years or decades after a discovery, because it can take that long to realize the implications.

Slow and steady success in science has made researchers hopeful

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