COVID red zone violations caught on camera in New York City spark concern

MIDWOOD, Brooklyn (WABC) — As officials push to lower the number of COVID-19 cases in New York City’s hot zones, enforcement concerns continue.

There have been several incidents of people blatantly not following the restrictions in those red zones – and there is fear about what this could mean as work continues to curb the infection rate.

Tuesday night in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, a crowd was spotted leaving what appeared to be a large indoor gathering.

Many people were seen on camera not wearing masks.

And on the same day that the mayor praised efforts to suppress the coronavirus, Eyewitness News found hundreds of young children being dismissed from a school.

They were herded onto buses Tuesday afternoon, some wearing masks, some not. All of them were attending Bais Yaacov School on 51st Street.

The building is inside the state’s red zone and should have been closed starting last week.

This

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What science and democracy have in common: us, hopefully

Parthenon in Athens, undergoing partial restorationThe Parthenon, a symbol of democracy, is undergoing renovation and repair—symbolically enough. Image courtesy of Vladimirya/Pixabay

Donald Trump has said, several times in the week up to and including September 29’s presidential debate, that he will not commit to a peaceful transfer of power should he lose the election in November. He said this in 2016, and it was frightening then. It is incomparably more frightening now, when he has the power of the presidency at his disposal, and when a Republican party that controls most of the levers of power has shown no inclination, now or in the last four years, to check his abuses of power. The President of the United States is telling us clearly that he has no respect for the most fundamental principle of democracy.

A few days after the debate, the White House revealed that Trump had contracted COVID-19. This was clearly a consequence

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Earth’s space junk problem is getting worse. And there’s an explosive component.

Before humans first started sending objects into Earth orbit, the pocket of space around our planet was clear and clean. But the launch of Sputnik 1 in October of 1957 changed everything. Since then, the space debris has been accumulating, with the amount of useless, defunct satellites vastly outnumbering the operational objects in our orbit.



Lots of space debris is orbiting Earth, including non-functional satellites.


© Provided by Live Science
Lots of space debris is orbiting Earth, including non-functional satellites.

A new annual report from the European Space Agency (ESA) has found that while we have become aware of the problem and taken steps in recent years to mitigate it, those steps are currently not keeping up with the sheer scale of space junk.

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All spacefaring nations have contributed to the problem, which is significant: as more and more defunct objects populate near-Earth space, the risk of collision rises – which, as objects crash and shatter, produces even

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How JPMorgan and BlackRock are thinking of playing fund manager M&A

  • Top brass from JPMorgan and BlackRock, among the firms to kick off earnings season with their results, said Tuesday that they expect more consolidation in the wealth- and asset-management industries.
  • Pressures on money managers have fueled a flurry of acquisitions in those areas this year, and analysts questioned executives about their own deal ambitions, albeit coming from different corners of the market. 
  • JPMorgan boss Jamie Dimon said the bank would be “very interested” in deals in that space, and BlackRock finance chief Gary Shedlin said the firm was focused on targets that could expand its technology, global distribution, and private markets capabilities.
  • Last week, Morgan Stanley said it would buy investment manager Eaton Vance in a deal valued at $7 billion just days after it closed on its E-Trade acquisition. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Top brass at the world’s largest asset manager and largest US bank told

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Eruptions Of Old Faithful Geyser In Yellowstone Could Become Less Frequent Or Completely Cease In A Warmer Climate

Old Faithful is a geyser in Yellowstone National Park, named after its regularity in erupting hot water and steam, fed by the geothermal activity of the Yellowstone supervolcano underneath.

In the last several decades, scientists have observed that Old Faithful’s interval between eruptions has changed considerably, stretching from about 60-65 minutes in the 1950s to about 90-94 minutes since 2001.

A geyser’s eruption is feed by a complex, underground vent system filled with water. As the magma in the underground heats up the groundwater, steam pressure will build up until it is sufficient to trigger a steam eruption on the surface. According to the scientists, no major changes have occurred in the thermal state of Yellowstone, excluding this factor as an explanation for the delay in Old Faithful’s eruptions. Another possible factor controlling geyser activity

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Don’t Buy an iPhone 12 Just for 5G

Apple’s new iPhone 12 lineup, revealed Tuesday, has plenty of the upgrades you’d expect: a faster processor, a better camera, a new design. But the feature that’s getting the most hype is the new 5G wireless chip, which will let the devices connect to the latest high-speed mobile broadband networks.

Apple CEO Tim Cook talked up the benefits of including the new cellular standard in the iPhone 12 line, citing improvements on everything from video streaming to consumer privacy. “Each generation of cellular technology on iPhone has enabled breakthrough innovations and entirely new opportunities for our developers and our users,” said Cook during the virtual event. “For so many people this all becomes real with 5G coming to iPhone.”

It’s about time the iPhone gets 5G, a feature that’s been available on Android phones for years. But whether 5G is really a selling point is out of Apple’s hands—in

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The Technology 202: Apple and Verizon say 5G is here. That’s not exactly true yet.

“5G just got real,” Verizon chief executive Hans Vestberg said onstage, as he touted his company’s plans to double its availability in some cities and roll out to 60 new markets by the end of 2020.

But in reality, 5G remains a work in progress throughout the United States. 

Access to 5G networks is limited to a handful of U.S. cities, and in some instances, it’s currently slower than 4G speeds, my colleague Geoffrey Fowler has found through tests with multiple phones. And my colleagues note that the fastest early deployments have been concentrated in areas most Americans aren’t visiting very much since the pandemic began such as stadiums. 

“It will likely be a few more years before we see what kind of revolution 5G will bring about in the tech world,” Stan Adams, the deputy general counsel at the Center for Democracy and Technology, said in an email. 

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Canon’s EOS M50 Mark II mirrorless camera is aimed at creators

Canon has unveiled the 24-megapixel EOS M50 Mark II with relatively minor updates to the popular original aimed mostly at creators. The biggest change is an upgraded Dual Pixel autofocus system that now allows for continuous eye-tracking in video, rather than in just some still modes as before. That will make it more practical for interviews or vlogging (albeit in HD only and not 4K) as the camera can keep your subject in focus by itself.

Canon EOS M50 Mark II APS-C mirrorless camera
Canon EOS M50 Mark II APS-C mirrorless camera

It can also capture vertical video that you can stream on YouTube live using a smartphone connection. And for vloggers, the flip-out display offers a tap-to-record button, along with tap-to-focus and a movie self timer. On the photo side, the EOS M50 II now has an electronic shutter option. Topping off the new options is webcam support with Canon’s EOS utility software.

Other features remain the

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A Nonprofit Media Platform Redefining What Our Future Might Be

Founded by author, columnist and host of the podcast “What Could Go Right” Zachary Karabell, the nonprofit news platform shares original and aggregated content created by a network of invitation-only members who are experts in their fields. The Network begins with more than 70 members who are united in the belief that the world’s problems are solvable, such as David Brooks, Peniel E. Joseph, Steven Pinker, Bina Venkataraman, Krista Tippett and Fareed Zakaria.

The Progress Network’s members hold to principles required for a better future—trust in science, international cooperation, the furthering of education, long-term thinking and the celebration of progress. Areas of focus include politics, health, science, foreign affairs, climate change, technology, psychology, race relations and economic outcomes, among others. 

“In the midst of a global pandemic and a contentious presidential election, both of which are unlike anything we have seen before, there is

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7 Big Tech Stocks to Buy For Blockchain And Crypto Exposure

InvestorPlace – Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips

Following the creation of the first cryptocurrency Bitcoin (BTC) in 2009, other cryptocurrencies such as Ethereum (ETH) and Ripple (XRP), followed suit to bring further attention to blockchain technology.

But there’s a lot of potential for the blockchain. According to recent research led by Vida J. Morkunas of Lulea University of Technology, Sweden and published by the Kelly School of Business, Indiana University:

“Emerging technologies regularly serve as enabling forces for economic, social, and business transformation.. [B]lockchain placed among the top five technology trends in 2018… Therefore, blockchain is predicted to challenge existing business models and offer opportunities for new value creation.”

As you probably know, the blockchain is a public digital ledger and a record-keeping technology. All transactions that have written in blocks are immutable, and information can never be erased. Furthermore, they are transparent to all parties in

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