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New global temperature data will inform study of climate impacts on health, agriculture — ScienceDaily

A seemingly small one-to-two degree change in the global climate can dramatically alter weather-related hazards. Given that such a small change can result in such big impacts, it is important to have the most accurate information possible when studying the impact of climate change. This can be especially challenging in data sparse areas like Africa, where some of the most dangerous hazards are expected to emerge.

A new data set published in the journal Scientific Data provides high-resolution, daily temperatures from around the globe that could prove valuable in studying human health impacts from heat waves, risks to agriculture, droughts, potential crop failures, and food insecurity.

Data scientists Andrew Verdin and Kathryn Grace of the Minnesota Population Center at the University of Minnesota worked with colleagues at the Climate Hazards Center at the University of California Santa Barbara to produce and validate the data set.

“It’s important to have this

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Agriculture Department Killed 1.2 Million Wild Animals in 2019

Among the animals the Wildlife Services program killed this year are 61,882 adult coyotes, plus an unknown number of coyote pups in 251 destroyed dens.

Among the animals the Wildlife Services program killed this year are 61,882 adult coyotes, plus an unknown number of coyote pups in 251 destroyed dens.
Photo: David McNew (Getty Images)

The mission of Wildlife Services, an office in the Department of Agriculture (USDA), is “to provide federal leadership and expertise to resolve wildlife conflicts to allow people and wildlife to coexist.” In practice, that means slaughtering animals in droves.

New data the USDA released this week shows that in 2019, the program killed approximately 1.2 million animals native to North America. That includes hundreds of gray wolves, black bears, and bobcats, thousands of red foxes, tens of thousands of beavers, and hundreds of thousands of birds. Fewer than 3,000 of those animals were killed unintentionally.

Program employees are deployed to deal with dangerous feral hog populations and keep bird populations at airports under control so planes

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NASA technology to reveal crop health insights for agriculture industry

A Georgia-based company called Cybercorps LLC plans to offer real-time agricultural data for farmers, resource managers, first responders, and other interested user groups with the help of a patented NASA technology. Cybercorps has signed a license agreement with NASA for the Compact Thermal Imager (CTI), a technology developed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

The technology, conceived at Goddard by CTI Principal Investigator Murzy Jhabvala, is small enough to fit on a cube satellite, or CubeSat, a type of miniaturized satellite whose size is measured in units of 10 square centimeters that plays a growing role at NASA for science missions and technology demonstrations. Though tiny in size, CTI can provide high-resolution information about crop health and soil conditions by measuring surface temperature. After collecting more than 15 million images of Earth during a successful demonstration on the International Space Station in 2019, the instrument is now

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