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Everyone can play a part in conserving Australia’s World Heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef — ScienceDaily

Many Australians do not know what they can individually do to make a difference to the health of the World Heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR), according to a survey led by QUT researchers.

The researchers found most Australians are not making a connection between climate change and reef health and say there is more individuals could do on this front, both in the home and to influence government policies.

Senior Research Fellow Dr Angela Dean conducted the online survey of 4,285 Australians with Professor Kerrie Wilson, Director of QUT’s Institute for Future Environments, and Dr Robyn Gulliver from the University of Queensland.

The resulting paper, “Taking action for the Reef?” — Australians do not connect Reef conservation with individual climate-related actions, has been published in Conservation Letters: a journal of the Society for Conservation Biology.

“While there are many threats to reef health, including poor water quality stemming from

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Science vs humanities in Australia’s university fee shake-up | Australia

Canberra, Australia – University students enrolling in degrees in the humanities, law and economics in Australia will see their course fees more than double next year under legislation that has just passed the upper house which the government says will ensure higher education produces “job-ready graduates”.

Under the plan, a four-year Bachelor of Arts degree will cost as much as 58,000 Australian dollars ($41,619) from 2021, an increase of 113 percent compared with 2020.

The bill passed the Senate on Thursday after securing the votes of minority parties, all but guaranteeing it will become law when it returns to the lower house in a week or so.

Federal Education Minister Dan Tehan has said the changes are necessary because students need “to make more job-relevant choices” and study more science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) courses to ensure they become better prepared for the job market.

The bill comes as

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Tasmanian devils reintroduced into Australia’s mainland for 1st time in 3,000 years

The Tasmanian devil, the feisty marsupial that only resided on the island of Tasmania for the last 3,000 years, has been reintroduced into Australia’s mainland for the first time in 3,000 years.



a close up of a cat with its mouth open: A Tasmanian devil stands in a wooded area in an undated handout photo.


© Aussie Ark
A Tasmanian devil stands in a wooded area in an undated handout photo.

On Monday, 11 devils, along with six other species of small mammals, were released into a large preserve, where they’ll be able to roam free, forage for their own food and act as they would in the wild.

MORE: More than 1 billion animals estimated dead in Australia wildfires: Expert

The feat is a result of a decade-long project by Aussie Ark, an animal preservation organization that created an “insurance population” for the species, which is listed as endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List.

The release was welcome news after billions of animals were lost in the

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Australia’s report on agtech confirms technology can lead to a fertile future

The horizon scanning report on the future of agricultural technologies has identified how adopting new technologies — such as sensor, robotic, artificial intelligence (AI), data, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and distributed ledger — could improve the sector’s productivity, diversity, and profitability.

The Future of Agriculture Technologies report [PDF] was released by the Australian Council of Learned Academics (ACOLA) on Tuesday, after it was commissioned by Australia’s chief scientist Alan Finkel, on behalf of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), to undertake the project.

“Australia’s diverse agriculture, fisheries, and forestry sector is a AU$69 billion industry … however, reaching the government’s goal of AU$100 billion by 2030 will likely require more than just incremental technological advancements,” Finkel said.

“Historically, Australian producers have been rapid adopters of innovation, and these emerging technologies will help our agriculture sector to transform and tackle current and future challenges.”

The report highlighted how the deployment of technologies,

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