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The Amazing Secret To Cutting 25% Of Carbon Could Be Under Your Feet

The world is facing a climate crisis, spurred on by record-breaking levels of atmospheric CO2 generated by the burning of fossil fuels and the destruction of natural ecosystems.

But what if one of the best weapons in our fight against global carbon emissions lies right beneath our feet? That’s the claim of a new generation of biotech firms, who say they can turn the world’s soil into a vast carbon sink, absorbing up to a quarter of annual emissions.

One such company, Soil Carbon Co., based in Australia’s New South Wales, claims that by tailoring communities of microbes that live within farm soil, humans can potentially turn back the clock on human emissions while producing better crops.

“We develop microbiological seed treatments comprised of microbial fungi and bacteria designed to provide plant benefits,” explains Guy

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Investors urge heavy carbon emitters to set science-based reduction targets

FILE PHOTO: Cracked earth marks a dried-up area near a wind turbine used to generate electricity at a wind farm in Guazhou, 950km (590 miles) northwest of Lanzhou, Gansu Province September 15, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo

LONDON (Reuters) – Investors managing around $20 trillion in assets on Tuesday called on the heaviest corporate emitters of greenhouse gases to set science-based targets on the way to net zero carbon emissions by mid-century.

AXA Group and Nikko Asset Management Co are among 137 investors urging 1,800 companies responsible for a quarter of global emissions to act, coordinated by non-profit group CDP.

While more companies are pledging their support for the 2015 Paris agreement on climate change, aiming to be carbon neutral by 2050, not all have been clear about how they will get there.

To help limit global warming to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial norms by 2050, companies

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Fuels, not fire weather, control carbon emissions in boreal forest

Fuels, not fire weather, control carbon emissions in boreal forest
Rockets represent carbon stored in wood, trees, and soil in four main boreal forest regions. Though fire weather helps “ignite” the rockets, the amount of emissions each forest can produce is determined by fuel load (soil layers) and flammability (soil moisture). Credit: Victor Leshyk, Center for Ecosystem Science and Society

As climate warming stokes longer fire seasons and more severe fires in the North American boreal forest, being able to calculate how much carbon each fire burns grows more urgent. New research led by Northern Arizona University and published this week in Nature Climate Change suggests that how much carbon burns depends more on available fuels than on fire weather such as drought conditions, temperature, or rain. In a large retrospective study that stretched across Canada and Alaska, the international team of researchers found that the carbon stored belowground in soil organic matter was the most important predictor of how

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Especially the microbial part of the carbon cycle is affected — ScienceDaily

The deep sea is far away and hard to envision. If imagined it seems like a cold and hostile place. However, this remote habitat is directly connected to our lives, as it forms an important part of the global carbon cycle. Also, the deep seafloor is, in many places, covered with polymetallic nodules and crusts that arouse economic interest. There is a lack of clear standards to regulate their mining and set binding thresholds for the impact on the organisms living in affected areas.

Mining can reduce microbial carbon cycling, while animals are less affected

An international team of scientists around Tanja Stratmann from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany, and Utrecht University, the Netherlands, and Daniëlle de Jonge from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, has investigated the food web of the deep seafloor to see how it is affected by disturbances such as those caused

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Carbon creation finding set to rock astrophysics

Carbon creation finding set to rock astrophysics
Credit: Australian National University

A new measurement of how quickly stars create carbon may trigger a major shift in our understanding of how stars evolve and die, how the elements are created, and even the origin and abundance of the building blocks of life.


Physicists at the Australian National University and the University of Oslo reproduced how stars make carbon through a fleeting partnership of helium atoms known as the Hoyle state in two separate measurements. They found that carbon—the building block of life—is produced 34 percent faster than previously thought.

“It’s a really surprising result, with profound implications across astrophysics,” said Associate Professor Tibor Kibédi, one of the lead researchers from the Department of Nuclear Physics at ANU.

The Oslo experiment was reported in Physical Review Letters, and the ANU findings were published in Physical Review C.

Stars produce carbon through the triple-alpha process, where three alpha

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University of Oregon-led project identifies the age, depth and carbon stock of the world’s oldest tropical peatlands — ScienceDaily

Researchers probing peatlands to discover clues about past environments and carbon stocks on land have identified peatland that is twice as old and much deeper than previously thought.

Their findings, detailed in an open-access paper published Sept. 14 in the journal Environmental Research Letters, show that an inland site near Putussibau, not far from the Indonesia-Malaysia border, formed at least 47,800 years old and contains peat 18 meters deep — roughly the height of a six-story building.

The study provides new insights about the climate of equatorial rainforests, especially during the last ice age, said study co-author Dan Gavin, a professor of geography at the University of Oregon.

“This existence of this very deep and old peatland provides some clues on past climate,” Gavin said. “It tells us that this area remained sufficiently wet and warm to support peat growth through the last ice age. The climate during that

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New study reveals sheep and beef farms close to being carbon neutral



a group of sheep standing on top of a lush green field: The study found on average around 90 percent of emissions are being absorbed.


© Getty
The study found on average around 90 percent of emissions are being absorbed.

A new study shows New Zealand sheep and beef farms are already offsetting the bulk of their agricultural emissions.

The research – led by Dr Bradley Case at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) – estimates the woody vegetation on sheep and beef farms across the country is offsetting between 63 percent and 118 percent of on-farm agricultural emissions.

If the mid-point of that range is taken, on average around 90 percent of emissions are being absorbed.

Dr Case, who is a senior lecturer in GIS and remote sensing at AUT’s Applied Ecology Department in the School of Science, said the findings showed there was a strong case for farmers to get credit for the sequestration already happening on their farms.

“This is an integral part of He Waka

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