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Apple unveils new iPhones for faster 5G wireless networks

In a move that may annoy some consumers, Apple will no longer include charging adapters with new phones. It says that will mean smaller, lighter boxes that are more environmentally friendly to ship. Apple, however, separately sells power adapters that cost about $20 and $50, depending on how fast they charge phones.

Apple has one of the most loyal and affluent customer bases in the world, which has many analysts betting the next wave of phones will sell well. The iPhone remains the foundation of Apple’s business.

Apple boasted about the 5G capabilities and brought in Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg to champion the carrier’s network. 5G is supposed to mean much faster speeds, making it quicker to download movies or games, for instance.

But finding those speeds can be a challenge. While telecom operators have been rolling out 5G networks, significant boosts in speed are still uncommon in much of

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New Cadence Clarity 3D Transient Solver Delivers up to 10X Faster System-Level EMI Simulation

System design teams can quickly and accurately simulate large and complex hyperscale, automotive, mobile, and aerospace and defense systems

Cadence Design Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq: CDNS) today expanded its system analysis product line with the introduction of the Cadence® Clarity 3D Transient Solver, a system-level simulation solution that solves electromagnetic interference (EMI) system design issues up to 10X faster than legacy 3D field solvers and offers unbounded capacity. Built on Cadence’s massively parallel matrix solver technology, the Clarity 3D Transient Solver handles workload levels that previously required time-consuming and expensive anechoic test chambers to test prototypes for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) compliance. The new solver is capable of simulating large designs that until now have been impractical or unable to be solved, reducing respins and accelerating time to market. This makes it ideal for many complex applications in the hyperscale computing, automotive, mobile, and aerospace and defense markets. For more

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Asian shares mixed as China reports faster growth in trade

Shares are mixed in Asia after China reported its exports jumped nearly 10% in dollar terms in September as its economy recovered from the coronavirus pandemic

Shares were mixed in Asia on Tuesday, as investors were encouraged by strong growth in China’s trade in September.

An overnight rally on Wall Street, driven mainly by technology companies such as Apple and Amazon, faded amid worries over U.S. economic stimulus and a resurgence of coronavirus caseloads in many countries.

But the release of stronger trade data in Beijing helped Tokyo recover from early losses. Shanghai declined. Hong Kong’s market was closed for a typhoon.

China’s exports rose 9.9% from a year earlier to $239.8 billion in September, while imports gained 13.2% to $202.8 billion. Tuesday’s customs data showed

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5G could generate trillions in benefits in the next decade. So why aren’t companies moving faster with it?

In the next ten years, a whopping extra $8 trillion could be added to global GDP thanks to 5G-enabled industries, according to predictions from Nokia.

Research sponsored by the Finnish 5G equipment provider suggests that 5G will underpin the age of IoT, AI, smart cities and autonomous cars, and have a direct positive impact on business performance.

The findings seem at odds with the current context: while the Covid-19 pandemic continues to cripple small and large companies alike, some analysts predict that businesses will focus on near-term survival, and that investments in technologies that are not directly linked to recovery will take a backseat. It’s hard to get excited by 5G when you don’t even get to leave your house.

But Nokia’s research found that, instead of shying away from IT investments, the health crisis has prompted companies to double down on digital transformation programs. The report estimates, therefore, that

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Leaker: iPhone 12 Lineup to Feature Faster Face ID, Improved Zoom, and Longer Battery Life

Leaker Max Weinbach has today shared new “finalized and revised” information about the upcoming iPhone 12 via his Twitter account @PineLeaks.

Weinbach states that the “most important things” about the new iPhones were already revealed by Chinese Weibo user “Kang” via an extensive leak on Friday, but he does offer some specific new information.

Apple is reportedly still intending to ship the “dynamic zoning algorithm” feature, which could allow for faster Face ID. The notch may only be reduced in width on the 5.4-inch ‌iPhone 12‌ mini due to its smaller size. This would be achieved by arranging the components of the TrueDepth camera system more “tightly,” but at the cost of increasing its height. Alleged images of the ‌iPhone 12‌ mini’s screen emerged in July, which seemed to show a smaller notch.

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Nights are warming faster than days. Here’s what that means for the planet.

Climate change can have profound impacts across ecosystems, but rising average temperatures are just one factor among many driving those repercussions. A new study published in late September in Global Change Biology found that nighttime temperatures are increasing at a faster rate compared to daytime temps in most land areas across the Earth. That shift can influence everything from predator-prey dynamics to plant growth.



Nighttime ecology is particularly understudied, with most research focused on the daytime activities of organisms.


© Provided by Popular Science
Nighttime ecology is particularly understudied, with most research focused on the daytime activities of organisms.

“Climate change is already messing things up,” says Daniel Cox, an ecologist at the University of Exeter and lead author of the study. “But the 24-hour asymmetry is adding an extra dimension of complexity [for species].”

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Previous analyses have found that the rising greenhouse gases in our atmosphere are not having an even effect on temperatures from day to night. But Cox says this

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