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Antitrust investigation dubs App Store a monopoly, Microsoft adopts ‘app fairness’ rules, pandemic boosts Q3 app revenues

Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the TechCrunch series that recaps the latest OS news, the applications they support and the money that flows through it all.

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The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 204 billion downloads and $120 billion in consumer spending in 2019. People are now spending three hours and 40 minutes per day using apps, rivaling TV. Apps aren’t just a way to pass idle hours — they’re a big business. In 2019, mobile-first companies had a combined $544 billion valuation, 6.5x higher than those without a mobile focus.

In this series, we help you keep up with the latest news from the world of apps, delivered on a weekly basis.

Apple declared monopoly by U.S. House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust

Apple was one of the four big tech companies the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust declared as having enjoyed

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Blockchain Technology in Transportation and Logistics Market By Development, Trends, Investigation 2020 And Forecast To 2026

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Oct 08, 2020 (Profound via COMTEX) —
The report provides rational insights along with historical and forecast data to aid in better understanding of the Global Blockchain Technology in Transportation and Logistics Market. The report provides a comprehensive analysis of key factors that are expected to drive the growth of the Blockchain Technology in Transportation and Logistics market. This study also provides a detailed overview of the opportunities along with the current trends observed in the target market.

The report includes thorough compilation of the quantitative analysis of the industry for the period of 10 years in order to assist players to grow in the market. Insights on specific revenue figures generated are also given in the report, along with projected revenue at the end of the forecast period. This study includes a widespread analysis of the

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House investigation faults Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google for engaging in anti-competitive monopoly tactics

WASHINGTON – Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google engaged in anticompetitive, monopoly-style tactics to evolve into four of the world’s most powerful corporate behemoths, according to congressional investigators who called in a wide-ranging report released Tuesday for sweeping changes to federal laws so that government regulators can bring Silicon Valley back in check.

The roughly 450-page document, capping a roughly 16-month investigation by the House’s top antitrust committee, found that the four tech giants relied on dubious, harmful means to solidify their dominance in Web search, smartphones, social networking and shopping – and in the process evaded the very federal regulators whose primary task is to ensure that companies do not grow into such unmatched corporate titans.

Congressional investigators faulted Facebook for gobbling up potential competitors with impunity, and they concluded Google improperly scraped rivals’ websites and forced its technology on others to reach its pole position in search and advertising.

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House investigation faults Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google for engaging in anticompetitive monopoly tactics

Congressional investigators faulted Facebook for gobbling up potential competitors with impunity, and they concluded that Google improperly scraped rivals’ websites and forced its technology on others to reach its pole position in search and advertising. The lawmakers’ report labeled both of those firms as monopolies while faulting the federal government for failing to crack down on them sooner.

Amazon and Apple, meanwhile, exerted their own form of “monopoly power” to protect and grow their corporate footprints. As operators of two major online marketplaces — a world-leading shopping site for Amazon, and a powerful App Store for Apple — the two tech giants for years set rules that essentially put smaller, competing sellers and software developers at a disadvantage, the report found.

The House investigation stopped short of calling on the Trump administration to break up any of the companies. Instead, it proposed the most sweeping overhaul of U.S. antitrust law

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IRS under investigation for buying Americans’ smartphone location data

  • The IRS is under investigation by the US Treasury’s Inspector General for reportedly buying Americans’ smartphone location data in order to track them.
  • Democratic Sens. Ron Wyden and Elizabeth Warren called for the investigation last month after IRS agents told the senators that the agency bought people’s smartphone location data from a company called Venntel.
  • Venntel sells location data scraped from people’s smartphones that are gathered from normal apps like games, exercise apps, and weather apps.
  • While government agencies typically need to obtain a search warrant before gathering personal information from people’s phones, buying location data directly from private companies like Venntel lets them sidestep that requirement.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The IRS is under investigation by the US Treasury’s Inspector General over its practice of buying people’s smartphone data from private surveillance companies, according to a letter from the Inspector General obtained by Business Insider.

In

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