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New global temperature data will inform study of climate impacts on health, agriculture — ScienceDaily

A seemingly small one-to-two degree change in the global climate can dramatically alter weather-related hazards. Given that such a small change can result in such big impacts, it is important to have the most accurate information possible when studying the impact of climate change. This can be especially challenging in data sparse areas like Africa, where some of the most dangerous hazards are expected to emerge.

A new data set published in the journal Scientific Data provides high-resolution, daily temperatures from around the globe that could prove valuable in studying human health impacts from heat waves, risks to agriculture, droughts, potential crop failures, and food insecurity.

Data scientists Andrew Verdin and Kathryn Grace of the Minnesota Population Center at the University of Minnesota worked with colleagues at the Climate Hazards Center at the University of California Santa Barbara to produce and validate the data set.

“It’s important to have this

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Modelling extreme magnetic fields and temperature variation on distant stars

IMAGE

IMAGE: The maps show the heat distribution. The bue regions are cooler – and the yellow regions are hotter.

It describes data taken from the following magentars: 4U 0142+61, 1E 1547.0-5408, XTE…
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Credit: University of Leeds

New research is helping to explain one of the big questions that has perplexed astrophysicists for the past 30 years – what causes the changing brightness of distant stars called magnetars.

Magnetars were formed from stellar explosions or supernovae and they have extremely strong magnetic fields, estimated to be around 100 million, million times greater than the magnetic field found on earth.

The magnetic field generates intense heat and x-rays. It is so strong it also affects the physical properties of matter, most notably the way that heat is conducted through the crust of the star and across its surface, creating the variations in brightness across the star which has puzzled

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Can temperature scanning slow COVID-19 spread? Airports are the testing ground for new tech

A camera in the security lines at Dallas Love Field is scanning every passerby for elevated temperatures, in a test by the airport and Southwest Airlines to find out if it can detect sick people before they board flights.

In the back hallways, employees are getting temperature checks at kiosks before they start work each day, trying to keep sick employees out of the airport, too.

As airlines, companies and governments scramble to reopen a battered economy facing the eighth month of a worldwide pandemic, airports are now the frontline for evolving thermal imaging technologies designed to pick out infected travelers before they can spread COVID-19 further.

Temperature scanning device makers such as Dallas-based Wello Inc. and Beaumont’s Infared Cameras Inc. have suddenly been inundated with requests for their technology. Even small restaurants, hotels and schools are asking about it.

“It’s not just convention centers and airlines,” said Gary Strahan,

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Teledyne DALSA’s thermal imaging camera plays pivotal role in Nuvoola’s AI-powered elevated skin temperature screening solution

Nuvoola’s Luke AI Health Screening and Protection solution

Teledyne DALSA's Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution
Teledyne DALSA’s Calibir GXF thermal camera is a critical component within the Nuvoola Luke AI HSP solution

WATERLOO, Ontario, Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Teledyne DALSA, a Teledyne Technologies [NYSE:TDY] company, and global leader in digital imaging technology, is pleased to provide its new Calibir GXF thermal camera as a critical component within Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution.

The new Calibir GXF model is optimized for elevated skin temperature detection with measurement accuracy and thermal stability better than +/-0.3°C with an external reference (as recommended by IEC80601-2-59). Like Calibir GXM models, the new GXF camera is NDAA, Section 889 compliant with IEC 80601-2-59-2017 certification pending.

Nuvoola’s LUKE™ AI Health Screening and Protection (HSP) solution is unique in using their artificial

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